Citizen Science: eBird

eBird was launched in 2002 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society. It helps bird-watchers keep records of observations. It’s another example of citizen science. eBird aggregates millions of bird sightings, which is very useful for scientists studying the movement, survival and behavior of birds. eBird provides researchers tools to understand all the data that is collected.

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Citizen Science: Breeding Bird Survey

The North American Breeding Bird Survey is a cooperative effort between the United States and Canada. The bird survey is a longterm, largescale, international avian monitoring program started in 1966 to track the status and trends of North America’s birds. If significant declines are detected, causes can then be identified and action taken, to reverse them before populations reach critically low levels.

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Citizen Science: Bird Banding

How do scientists get the data they need to study birds? A lot of data is collected by volunteers, “citizen scientists,” through bird surveys and bird banding. Bird banding is a universal and indispensable technique for studying the movement, survival and behavior of birds.

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Citizen Science: Mid-winter Eagle Survey

When America adopted the bald eagle as the national symbol in 1782, there may have been 100,000 nesting eagles. But the eagle population declined, in part due to pesticides. By 1963, with only 487 nesting pairs remaining, our national symbol was near extinction. Bald eagles were listed as an endangered species in 1967, and that afforded them protection. In 1979, the government started the Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey to establish an index of the bald eagle population in the lower 48 states.

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