Lark Bunting

Lark Bunting

This year, 2016, marks the centennial of the first Migratory Bird Treaty, which the United States signed with Great Britain on behalf of Canada. That treaty and the three that followed — with Japan, Russia and Mexico — form the cornerstones of our efforts to conserve migratory birds, like the Lark Bunting. Grassland birds share similarities. Some winter in south New Mexico and south Texas, but most fly into the northern third of Mexico. They winter in the Chihuahuan Desert that straddles the U.S.-Mexico border in the northern part of the Mexican Plateau. These birds commute north to breed — some as far as the prairies of central Canada, but many brood their young in the shortgrass prairies of the High Plains.

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Ferruginous Hawk

Ferruginous Hawk

This year, 2016, marks the centennial of the first Migratory Bird Treaty, which the United States signed with Great Britain on behalf of Canada. That treaty and the three that followed — with Japan, Russia and Mexico — form the cornerstones of our efforts to conserve migratory birds, like the Ferruginous Hawk. Many Ferruginous Hawks migrate in Spring to the far northern latitudes to breed and brood, and return to the southwest states and Mexico to winter. For others, their idea of “north” isn’t so ambitious — they might fly north only as far as Nebraska or Kansas to hatch chicks. And some of them really don’t migrate.

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Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Cranes

This year, 2016, marks the centennial of the first Migratory Bird Treaty, which the United States signed with Great Britain on behalf of Canada. That treaty and the three that followed — with Japan, Russia and Mexico — form the cornerstones of our efforts to conserve migratory birds, like the Sandhill Crane. Lots of High Plains residents have experience with the Sandhill Crane, a bird that departs its Texas and New Mexico wintering grounds late in the winter for its yearly trip to Canada, Alaska and even Siberia to reproduce, one chick per year.

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