Playa Recharge & Management Tools

PLJV has developed a set of online tools that bring playas and their connection to the Ogallala aquifer to life for farmers, ranchers, resource managers, and others throughout the region. The Playa Recharge and Wetness Estimators allow users to compare our data to their personal experiences of how water behaves in local playas, which we hope will spur conversation about playa conservation, water supplies, and the aquifer, while the Playa Land Use Calculator helps producers determine how conservation programs can meet their operational objectives.

Playa Recharge and Wetness Estimators

The Playa Recharge and Wetness Estimators are built on a simple, interactive map platform, which allows anyone to explore the playa landscape, calculate an estimate of how much water recharges through playas on their land, and learn about past patterns of wetness for their playas in different seasons. The tool also includes answers to frequently asked questions and links to more information about playas and their role in recharging the aquifer.

Start using the Playa Recharge and Wetness Estimators by visiting PlayaEstimators.com.

Funding for the Playa Estimators was provided by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kansas and New Mexico and by High Plains Water District in Texas.

Playa Land Use Calculator

The Playa Land Use Calculator helps producers make decisions about how to manage playas in fields that are typically farmed and determine how USDA conservation programs such as the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, Wetland Reserve Easements, and Conservation Reserve Program can meet their operational objectives. The tool can be used to explore tradeoffs and benefits of restoring or conserving a playa and allows users to customize the calculations with individual operational costs, local rates for conservation programs, and more.

The calculator is available to download as a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.

Funding for the Playa Land Use Calculator was provided by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kansas and New Mexico.